Vision-Casting: Developing Your Methodology

12.26.12_Celebrate_Success_and_Plan_for_2013So, we’ve dug through scripture to determine our biblical foundation.  We’ve lined that up with the cultural and contextual teachings that drive our ministry.  We’ve laid a foundation and built walls to form our structure….now for the fun stuff! What do we do?  How does our ministry function in the world?

 

Jeremy Pace from Resurgence calls this our furniture.  He puts it like this:

Furniture should complement and enhance the function of a room. Likewise, yourmethods (the how to’s) should be based on your theology and philosophy and should fitwithin the boundaries set by them. Remember, furniture is only functional for so longbefore it wears out and either needs to be replaced or reupholstered. The reality is thathaving a solid foundation and a clearly defined framework allows you to be creative andnot limited to how you go about doing ministry

furniture

To begin “furnishing” your ministry, ask yourself these questions:

•Based on your theology and philosophy, what are the methods that you will use to
see the vision fulfilled?

•Does your current furniture fit in the new rooms? Do you have a toilet in the living
room or a bed in the bathroom?

•How does your philosophy of ministry look organizationally?

•Do you have the right positions in your organization?

•How does each ministry/program fit within the philosophy?

It’s important to remember that the methodology should not drive the ministry.  Your philosophy and your theological foundation drive the ministry.  Don’t become so attached to a “how-to” that you find yourself “remodeling the room because you like the couch.”

Chicago-modern-colorful-sofa-sets

 

 

Vision-Casting: Your Philosophy is Your Filter

12.26.12_Celebrate_Success_and_Plan_for_2013Last week we talked about building the framework, or more aptly, the foundation for your ministry.  We began (or continued) working through the questions that every ministry leader should ask as they begin the process of deciding how their ministry should function in the world.

The theological foundation upon which you build is extremely important to defining your over all goals and mission on the field.  It has been a lengthy and prayerful process for me to work through taking the better part of a month and lots of wise counsel and prayer from my spiritual mentors.  Take time to nail this first part down, before moving on,

Once you’ve determined the scriptural basis for your ministry, it’s time to begin building the grid work which will become the filter through which all opportunities and ideas should pass when making decisions: the philosophy. Jeremy Pace of Resurgence likens these to the walls of a home.

You begin with the load-bearing walls.  These are immovable, unchangeable within the structure (else the structure falls down). They are the primary grid which make up the shape and form of a home.  Ask yourself the question:

•What are the non-negotiable, prescribed truths of Scripture that set the boundaries?

The next step is to begin constructing the interior walls.  These determine what you are and are not about.  Ask yourself these questions:

•What biblical imperatives and indicatives does your church/ministry/organization need to explicitly articulate because they are overlooked?

•What biblical imperatives and indicatives does your church/ministry/organization practice faithfully (almost without thinking)?

•What biblical imperatives and indicatives does the culture and context of your church ignore or fight against? These you will want to make more explicit.

•What biblical imperatives and indicatives are paralleled within your culture and context but need to be connected? (These too you will want to make more explicit.)

These questions will begin to define the type of culture your ministry will subscribe to and thus become the filter for everything that you do.

snail crossing finish lineSo I am on to building these walls.  I said this before, but I think it bears repeating, this has not been a speedy process for me- although I must admit I thought I had already done most of this work.  What I have found is that as I dig, God opens up questions in my heart.  He opens up visions of something more in places and less in others and is awakening me to a renewed sense of purpose through my ministry.  I hope and pray that as you work through these questions with me, he does the same for you as well.

Visioncasting 2013: The Year of the Verse

12.26.12_Celebrate_Success_and_Plan_for_2013

I’m doing something a little different this year in setting my theme for the year.

Generally I choose a one word theme for the year.  This is a popular thing to do, particularly in the blogging community, to choose a word to meditate on that will define the course of your writing for the year.  One year, I chose ‘relationship.’ Another, ‘Sabbath.’ Last year was ‘solitude.’

This year in seeking God’s word for me this year, he brought to me a verse instead.

It really started while I was attending a class at Adullam School of Warriors on Wednesday night.  The instructor, Stan Tyra, wrecked me with a lesson on honor.  And then this morning, in my devotional time one of the verses God brought to me a verse that reinforced his message.

Finally, all of you, have unity of mind, sympathy, brotherly love, a tender heart, and a humble mind. Do not repay evil for evil or reviling for reviling, but on the contrary, bless, for to this you were called, that you may obtain a blessing. 10 For

“Whoever desires to love life
and see good days,
let him keep his tongue from evil
and his lips from speaking deceit;
11 let him turn away from evil and do good;
let him seek peace and pursue it.
12 For the eyes of the Lord are on the righteous,
and his ears are open to their prayer.
But the face of the Lord is against those who do evil.” – 1 Peter 3:8-12

The gist of it is this:  Honor.  That’s it. Period.  Whether you think a person deserves it, whether you think it is fair or not, especially when it requires a supernatural act of will to do so.  Honor because it is what you, as Christ’s beloved, undeserving, grace-lavished child, are called to.

The vision of how living this verse could change my family grabbed hold of me.  I posted it to the refrigerator. I’ve prayed it over me in one way or another every morning since.  So as I prayed for a word, God gave me this verse and so I started out this post thinking to say that I didn’t have a single word for the year, but instead a theme verse. Perhaps even a life verse.  And I do.

But I suppose I also have a word:

Honor.

What’s your word this year?

A little footnote:

I don’t usually read the Amplified version of the Bible (probably because all its paranthetical clauses drive me crazy and remind me too much of my own writing. 🙂 ) But I loved the way the Amp Bible breaks this verse down.  I thought maybe you would like it to:

Finally, all [of you] should be of one andthe same mind (united in spirit), sympathizing [with one another], loving [each other] as brethren [of one household], compassionate and courteous (tenderhearted and humble).

Never return evil for evil or insult for insult (scolding, tongue-lashing, berating), but on the contrary blessing [praying for their welfare, happiness, and protection, and truly pitying and loving them]. For know that to this you have been called, that you may yourselves inherit a blessing [from God—that you may obtain a blessing as heirs, bringing welfare and happiness and protection].

10 For let him who wants to enjoy life and see good days [good—whether apparent or not] keep his tongue free from evil and his lips from guile (treachery, deceit).

11 Let him turn away from wickedness andshun it, and let him do right. Let him search for peace (harmony; undisturbedness from fears, agitating passions, and moral conflicts) and seek it eagerly. [Do not merely desire peaceful relations with God, with your fellowmen, and with yourself, but pursue, go after them!]

12 For the eyes of the Lord are upon the righteous (those who are upright and in right standing with God), and His ears are attentive to their prayer. But the face of the Lord is against those who practice evil [to oppose them, to frustrate, and defeat them]. – 1 Peter 3:8-12

How to Find a Great Speaker for Your Event-Pt 2

Good speakers are everywhere.  They are right under your own noses in your Sunday School classes, in your congregations, in your women’s groups, they are down the street from you, across town or across the country. With a little patience and the posts in this series, you will find the perfect speaker for your next event.
2.0-Speaking_Microphone
Last week, we looked at the foundation you need to lay to begin preparing to book a speaker.  Today we talk about the nuts and bolts of booking one.

So you’ve determined what you want your audience to come away with, what you need, when, where and how much you can spend. You’ve even found a few great candidates through a speaker’s bureau and online. Now what?

1. Review your options and interview your speaker candidates

This sounds like a no-brainer, but you would  be surprised how many groups will try to handle most of the business of booking a speaker via email.  Insist on interviewing your speaker candidates at least once.

  • A professional speaker will be a real partner in this process. Often they will ask questions about the needs of your audience and what they can accomplish for you. Ask your candidates for references and, if they are speaking in your area, ask if you can attend the program and observe them in action.
  • Assure that a potential speaker has addressed groups similar to yours. Talk with them about their experience. Ask for a biography, testimonials and videos of their presentations, preferably before a live audience.
  • Find a speaker who will tailor his or her presentation to your group.

2. Select your speaker

  • Hire a professional and you’ll hire an ally. Professional speakers understand that your reputation is riding on their performance. Their experience with hundreds of audiences can add to your peace of mind and to the success of the event.

3. Get it in writing

You should have a letter of agreement or contract that clearly outlines the expectations of both you and your speaker. Consider:

  • Travel arrangements and transportation– will your speaker fly or drive? Booking a local speaker is a great way to save money in this area. Be prepared to reimburse mileage, travel expenses or a flat transportation fee.
  • Accommodations and meals- I prefer to stay with a congregation member.  If this is the case, make sure to create a space for your speaker to be alone. We’ll talk more about how to make a speaker feel welcome in a later post.
  • fees, reimbursements and payment terms- I think I’ve covered this sufficiently.  Don’t think you need to pay an arm and a leg for a great speaker, but do plan to pay something.   Work out how you are going to pay, where the payment is sent to and what format it needs to be in.
  • Whether you want the speaker to attend social events – this is especially important during conferences. If you are going to request the speaker attend events (dinners, meet and greets and the like) outside the scheduled speaking time, let them know ahead of time, while you are discussing the contract.
  • If the speaker may sell products and if so, how this will be handled- This is most often how I make ends meet.  Often speaker’s will lower their fee if they are given the opportunity to sell merchandise.
  • An agreement on any audio- or videotaping of the presentation- Oh, this one has gotten me in trouble before.  Specifically discuss whether it is ok to record the presentation or not and whether it is ok to sell the recording of said presentation later.
  • Cancellation policies- What happens if the conference is cancelled or if the speaker gets sick? Talk about these things beforehand. They do happen. It doesn’t have to be a crisis if it’s discussed prior.
  • Audio/visual requirements- What kind of equipment (microphones, projector, sound, video, etc) does she need?
  • and legal implications, if any, your contract may contain.

4. Work with your speaker

Share information about your group or . This will help the speaker become familiar with your organization, while facilitating a customized presentation.

  • Send your newsletter or anything which would include key people, buzz words or insider news and views.
  • Give the speaker a clear outline of what you expect.
  • Be specific about the size and demographics of your audience.
  • Let the speaker know in advance about other speakers on the program. This gives the speaker the opportunity to build on (and not duplicate) what the other speakers say.

5. Set the stage

  • Make sure the room is set up for optimum impact. Consider the number of chairs and how they are arranged. Also consider room temperature and lighting.
  • Stay on schedule. Although a professional will be able to “make up” time or slow things down if needed, keeping your program on schedule will allow your audience to get the full impact of the program you have created for them.
  • Your speaker should be able to provide you with a good introduction of themselves and their topic. The introduction should be short, energizing and create positive expectations.

6. Evaluate the results

  • Have your audience complete evaluations on the speaker and his/her presentation. This will allow you to gauge your results and plan for future programs. Send copies of the evaluations to your speaker.

So there you go, the steps to finding your best speaker ever!  I hope it helps make the process easier for you!  If you have any questions on this post, please feel free to comment below.  

How to Find a Great Speaker for Your Event-Pt 1

Good speakers are everywhere.  They are right under your own noses in your Sunday School classes, in your congregations, in your women’s groups, they are down the street from you, across town or across the country. With a little patience and the posts in this series, you will find the perfect speaker for your next event.
2.0-Speaking_Microphone
Your speaker selection is one of the most important elements in a successful event, but finding the right speaker for your retreat or event can be a daunting task. Just google Christian Women’s Speaker- there are a few of us out there :). So how do you decide? Over the next couple of weeks, I’ll lay out the steps your group needs to walk through to make sure you get a great speaker for your event.

In this post, we’ll talk about the first steps you need to take to lay the groundwork to find the perfect speaker to fit your agenda. This foundation is vital information and will help you immensely in your search. Next week, we’ll discuss the ins and outs of hiring/contracting a speaker for your event.

1. Determine the needs of your audience

Thorough knowledge of the needs of your group is essential in selecting the right speaker. What message are you trying to impart? What do you want your attendees to walk away with? Do you want to just have fun and fellowship? Build connections? Do you want a Bible teacher or a motivational speaker or a retreat leader- they are very different animals, you know?

You need to have a really good idea of what you want for your attendees, who they are and what they need.  One of the best groups I’ve worked with was a women’s committee who knew that they wanted a fun and inspirational message for their group, but they didn’t want to put anyone on the spot with interactive activities. I respected that they knew enough about their group that the committee could tell me how to structure my talk.

2. Establish your date, time and budget

Did you notice that this isn’t step 1?  You see the most important thing is for you to understand what my friend calls your “philosophy of ministry.” Before she goes into ANY event plan, her first question is “what are we trying to accomplish with this event?” Answer that question FIRST

THEN, start planning logistics:

  • Start looking for a speaker as soon as the date for your event is set. Many speakers book engagements up to a year in advance and you will want to get on their calendar as soon as possible.For example, I am writing this post in December- my calendar for the next year is almost completely booked in the months of April, June and October.
  • Consider how much time you have to fill and where that time falls in your overall program. If your time slot is flexible, a professional speaker can often tell you the right amount of time for the job. A professional can also make recommendations about the flow of an event. Elements like worship, fellowship time, time to eat, and where to plug in other speakers are program items a seasoned speaker can help you place for a seamless event.
  • Factor in the fee you are willing or able to pay for a speaker. Your search for a speaker can be narrowed or broadened based upon your budget.  Plan to pay your speaker.  Many speakers have a set speaker’s fee.  Many don’t. I personally, choose to speak for a love offering (and travel expenses) not because I don’t think I am worth a hefty speaker’s fee or churches can’t pay one, but because God has called me to trust His provision for this season of my ministry.

I used to work within a fee structure in the thousands of dollars for one speaking event. And here’s the thing, when I asked for a speaker’s fee, no one balked….not one church or organization thought it was ok to send me away with a gift card to Chik-fil-a and an ornament made by the kids at craft time (please don’t think I have anything against Chik-fil-a or homemade ornaments.) Since I’ve begun requesting a love offering, I have been sent away with that more than once. I love these things as much as the next girl, but they don’t put new shoes on my kiddos feet.

Whoever you choose to be your speaker deserves to be compensated for the time and effort it took to prepare for your event. A well thought out talk doesn’t just fall out of a speaker’s mouth, it takes preparation, study and prayer.  I will often spend 20-30 hours preparing for a 45 minute talk.  A weekend retreat can take up to 100 hours to prepare for, not to mention the time spent travelling to and from the event.  So consider that part of your logistical planning.  Please don’t think that I am saying you have to pay thousands (or even hundreds) of dollars for a great speaker, but also understand your speaker is trying to feed her family and compensate her accordingly. Some speakers may negotiate their fees when they are doing more than one program for you or when they are allowed to sell their products. Ask about your options.

3. Identify the type of speaker who will best match the needs of your audience

A speaker’s expertise in a given field may be the big draw, but a well-known name does not guarantee a professional presentation. High prices don’t always mean high quality. Will your audience and the overall program benefit most from a celebrity; a popular Bible teacher; a best-selling author; or a professional speaker who has a thorough knowledge of the appropriate topic?

4. Locate your resources

  • Personal referrals are a great way to narrow your search. Ask colleagues and other ministry leaders for recommendations.
  • Speakers bureaus locate and book speakers according to your specifications and needs. A bureau can locate speakers and quote fees. Many bureaus specialize in particular speakers such as celebrities, authors or athletes. You can also use the internet to find Speakers bureaus and, for that matter, Christian Women’s Speakers (google it, it’s amazing what you come up with.) There are a few bureaus that I have worked with in the past and know the requirements to be extensive and the quality of speakers to be really wonderful:

– Christian Speaker Services – http://www.christianspeakersservices.com/

-Proverbs 31 Ministries- http://www.proverbs31.org/speakers/

-ProvenWay Ministries – http://www.provenway.org/presenters/

One caveat of using a speaker’s bureau is that speaker’s bureaus very rarely negotiate fees.  There is generally a finders fee paid to the bureau that increases the overall fee for that speaker.  Don’t be afraid to choose a speaker who is not associated with a bureau.  I have worked both ways, and prefer to be unattached to a bureau in order to maintain control over my speaking fees.

 So there you go, the first few steps to finding your best speaker ever!  Next week we’ll talk about what happens after you figure out what you are looking for and where to find her.  We’ll talk about negotiations, collaboration, contracts and evaluations.  If you have any questions on this post, please feel free to comment below.